Crafting idea
Coat of Arms "Indians"

Interdisciplinary topics, such as e. g. the topic "Indians", can be picked up on in art class very well, too. They exalt the imagination and provoke involvement with ones own creativity. Poles made of cardboard, which are often mistaken as totem poles, are particularly well suited for this purpose.

Poles for Coat of Arms in the Interdisciplinary topic "Indians"

Interdisciplinary topics, such as e. g. the topic "Indians", can be picked up on in art class very well, too. They exalt the imagination and provoke involvement with ones own creativity. Poles made of cardboard, which are often mistaken as totem poles, are particularly well suited for this purpose.

This is what you need:

Opaque paint box K12, paint brush in the sizes 4 + 12, Pelikan PLAKA varnish on water basis, cardboard rolls in all variations, wallpaper paste, newspaper and a sturdy cardboard underlay (e.g. backside of a drawing pad).

 

It's as easy as this:

  1. First, follow the instructions to mix the wallpaper paste. One package will last for a whole class. From experience, every student will only need a small bowl full. Apart from that, for a trouble free gluing, the newspaper should be torn into small strips beforehand.

    Cover the tables to prevent getting spots of wallpaper paste on them. However, the stains are easily removable with water!

  2. Next, arrange the cardboard rolls so they look like the poles for the coat of arms and attach them using pieces of newspaper and some wallpaper paste. There is no limit to your imagination, remember - it is your personal coat of arms pole you are making.
  3. After the wallpaper paste has dried, cover the entire basic structure with a layer of paper mache. In addition, the pole has to be fastened to the cardboard underlay using newspaper and wallpaper paste.
  4. Now it's time for decorating! The opaque paints will come out even brighter, by painting the dry basic structure in white, beforehand. Then let every part dry thoroughly.

By helping each other, first staple the cardboard rolls together. After the coat of paper mache is dry, proceed making them to coat of arms poles.
  1. Using the brilliant opaque paints, let your imagination unfold when decorating the pole for the coat of arms. Perhaps, "mysterious signs", which can only be read by your students, or striking color effects, such as dark and light colors, are imaginable.

    Beyond that, the area surrounding the pole needs to be decorated, too. Maybe grassland , small hills or even mountains, puddles and valleys can emerge here. The surface, too, can be decorated with different materials. Small stones, stick or feathers can be used here. As it is a personal coat of arms pole, even little childhood memories and charms can be glued on it.

  2. Now top coat the opaque paint with the PLAKA varnish as a protective layer. The lacquer will not only protect the layer of opaque paint, it will also give the colors an even brighter appearance.
The brilliant opaque paints give the coat of arms pole its typical expression. Using a small paintbrush can help to make particular details stand out better.

Further decorative ideas for the coat of arms poles:

 

Information on Poles for Coat of Arms

Coat of arms poles were widely spread among the Native Americans of the northwest coast and are often mistaken as totem poles. Usually, the family memers carved their individual family coat of arms into the poles, sometimes, however, they were used as monuments for the dead, too.

The wood the poles were made of came from giant cedars that reached up as high as 20 meters. This sort of lumber had especially grown in the USA and Canada.

The family coat of arms, however, was not only depicted on the poles, but could also be found on dishes, weapons, boxes, blankets, house walls and many other everyday objects.

Often, the coat of arms poles were painted in bright colors. Important pieces of history and past events of famous families, even tribe myths were captured on such poles. Interpreting the meaning of the coat of arms poles is very complicated, as the myths and stories of the single tribes often remain unknown and the images depicted have been abstracted storngly.