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Effectivepainting

Mrs. Wolf sent us the idea "different color effects with light and dark shades" which we would like to introduce to you now.

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Your ideas: Effectivepainting

Different color effects with light and dark shades - an idea by Barbara Wolf, Ansbach

Mrs. Wolf sent us the idea "different color effects with light and dark shades" which we would like to introduce to you now.

Painted with Pelikan opaque paints: with simple color methods appears the effect as if you were looking out of a forest.

There are two questions to the long title "Effective painting – different color effects with light and dark shades" we have to find an answer to:

  1. How do I paint, so that it seems as if I am looking out of something?
  2. How do I paint, so that it seems as if I am looking into something?
 

Pre-exercise:

Color some circles by choosing colors of lighter and darker shades. The nuances should be colored beside each other, don’t jump to different rings of the circle (see example: blue=dark, green=middle, yellow=light). This way you can create different color effects that give you the impression as if you were looking into or out of something. Use our download template and you can begin immediately!

Variation:

You can also try this with other colors. Also the shades from cold to warm colors and the other way around are interesting to explore, just follow your inspiration!

Download template "pre-exercise" and own circles with the effects:
(from top to bottom) looking out of, into and into something

 

Topical approach, part 1: Looking out of the forest.

The general set up of the picture is created by painting from the back to the front. Each color expanse is painted on top of each other.

It’s easy:

  1. Paint the background, so the whole page, yellow and let it dry.
  2. Paint tree trunks with roots (only on the bottom!) and branches (only on the top!) on the left and right side of the page,leaving space in the middle for the glade, and always let the paint dry. Be careful to use darker shades the further you get to the papers edges.
  3. You can let some branches grow out of the tree trunks and sprinkle some leaves on the upper rim of the page.
  4. Finally, draw some animals and plants in the picture with colored pencils.
Tuitional examples from Barbara Wolf

Topical approach, part 2: Looking in to the forest

Again, the general set up of the picture is created by painting from the back to the front. Each color expanse is painted on top of each other.

This is how you do it:

  1. Paint the whole background, so the whole page, blue (but not too dark) and let it dry.
  2. Mix the next colors with the Chinese white. In layers, paint tree trunks with roots (only on the bottom!) and branches (only on the top!) always giving the paint time to dry – the more you get to the front of the picture, the lighter the colors have to become. (The last trees can now also stand in the middle of the picture, as there will be no glade.)
  3. Let some branches grow out of the tree trunks and sprinkle some leaves on the upper rim of the picture.
  4. To complete the picture, again, you may draw some animals and plants with colored pencils, if you like.
Tuitional examples from Barbara Wolf